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Labeling, 2015

Spectrum of labels

Victim Child welfare perspective
Offender Public safety perspective
  • In need of aid, assistance, or care

  • In need of services

  • In need of supervision

  • Unruly

  • Status offender

In New Hampshire, status offenses are classified as Children in Need of Services and includes truancy, running away from home, commission of an act which would not be a crime if committed by an adult, a child with a diagnosis of severe emotional, cognitive, or other mental health issues who engages in aggressive, fire setting or sexualized behaviors that pose a danger to the child or others.

Age boundaries, 2016

  • Status offense jurisdiction

    Up through 17 years old

    No lower age specified

  • Delinquency jurisdiction

    Up through 17 years old

    No lower age specified

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In New Hampshire, no lower age is specified for a “child in need of services.” The highest age a child’s conduct can be considered a status offense is 17. Non-delinquent behaviors include: truancy (must be at least age 6), running away, disregarding caregiver commands and being unsafe, as well as some child-only, fine-only (criminal code) violations. Youth diagnosed with severe emotional, cognitive, or other mental health issues who engage in aggressive, fire setting, or sexualized behaviors that pose a danger to the child or others and unable to receive services as a delinquent or dependent child can also receive the label. With consent, jurisdiction may continue to age 21 to receive services for successful adulthood. N.H. Rev. Stat. § 169-D:2, 169-D:3

Reported data

About this project

Juvenile Justice GPS (Geography, Policy, Practice, Statistics) is a project to develop a repository providing state policy makers and system stakeholders with a clear understanding of the juvenile justice landscape in the states.

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